Nutrition Corner: Eggs are great source of protein

Nutrition Corner Mary R. Ehret -

It’s almost spring and Easter eggs will be out decorating the grocery store shelves. Health-conscious folks will choose the real eggs more often than the sugar-coated eggs. Why? Because eggs are a great low cost source of protein.

Eggs are reasonably priced, nutritious and an excellent source of protein. One large egg contains 6 grams of protein. The egg white contains most of the protein, 3.6 grams and a considerable amount 2.7 grams is in the yolk.

In the past, many of us did not eat eggs because of the amount of cholesterol in eggs. A review of new scientific research enabled the 2015 USDA Dietary Guidelines committee to lift the recommendation of limiting cholesterol. Instead, they stress the continued recommendation to limit saturated fat. Some foods, however, that are high in cholesterol are also high in saturated fats. It is important to read the food label.

The good news is eggs do not have large amounts of saturated fats. Less than half of the fat in one egg comes from saturated fat. For 70 calories, it is a great option to other high-saturated fat, high-protein foods.

Traditionally, we eat hard-boiled eggs at Easter. However, think of hard-boiled eggs as an after school snack, lunch on the go or even a late-night snack. If it fits your budget, you can find hard-boiled eggs ready to eat, already cooked and peeled. If it does not fit your budget, here is how to cook a hard-boiled egg.

How to Cook Hard Boiled Eggs

Gently put 4-6 eggs in a pot and add enough water to cover the eggs by about 1 inch. Put the pan on the stove, turn the heat to medium-high, and bring the water to a boil. As soon as the water boils, turn off the heat, cover the pan and let it sit for 10 minutes. Fill a bowl with cold water and add some ice cubes. After 10 minutes, use a large slotted spoon to transfer the hot eggs to the bowl of ice water and let them cool for 5 minutes. Drain the eggs.

Start peeling the eggs at the large end. Hold egg under running cold water or dip in a bowl of water to help ease off the shell. If you do not want to use the eggs right away, store in the refrigerator, uncracked, until needed. They can be kept in the refrigerator for up to a week.

Here is a recipe from Michigan State University. Eggs will be soon on sale. Purchase eggs and pickle them. Remember to store in the refrigerator up to one month.

Refrigerated pickled eggs

16 fresh eggs

2 Tablespoons whole allspice

2 Tablespoons whole peppercorns

2 Tablespoons ground ginger

4 cups white vinegar (five percent)

2 Tablespoons white sugar

Directions: Cook eggs in simmering water for 15 minutes. Place eggs in cold water, remove shells and pack into jars that have been sterilized in boiling water for 10 minutes. In a pot, combine vinegar, sugar and spices. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for five minutes. Pour hot liquid over hard-boiled eggs. Put lid on jar. Store the finished product in the refrigerator. Use within a month. This recipe is not intended for long term storage at room temperature.

Nutrition Corner Mary R. Ehret
https://www.psdispatch.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/web1_Ehret.CMYK_-1.jpgNutrition Corner Mary R. Ehret

Mary Ehret is the Penn State Extension Nutrition Links Supervisor in Luzerne, Lackawanna, Monroe, Carbon, Sullivan and Bradford counties. Reach her at 570-825-1701 or at mre2@psu.edu.

Mary Ehret is the Penn State Extension Nutrition Links Supervisor in Luzerne, Lackawanna, Monroe, Carbon, Sullivan and Bradford counties. Reach her at 570-825-1701 or at mre2@psu.edu.